Throughout 2013, Seyfarth Shaw LLP’s dedicated Trade Secrets, Computer Fraud & Non-Competes Practice Group hosted a series of CLE webinars that addressed significant issues facing clients today in this important and ever changing area of law.

The series consisted of twelve webinars:

1. 2012 National Year in Review: What You Need to Know About the Recent Cases/Developments in Trade Secrets,
Continue Reading 2013 Trade Secrets Webinar Series – Year in Review

On Thursday, November 21, 2013, at 12:00 p.m. Central, Chicago Seyfarth attorneys  Paul Freehling, Scott Humphrey, and Jeffrey Swatzell will present the eleventh installment in our 2013 Trade Secrets webinar series. This webinar will involve a discussion about steps and responses companies can take when their confidential information and/or trade secrets appear, or are threatened to appear, on the internet.
Continue Reading Upcoming Webinar: My Company’s Confidential Information is Posted on the Internet! What Can I Do?

By Misty Blair

In August, we waved farewell to the Cybersecurity Act of 2012 (S.3414). Or, so we thought. The bill, which followed a tortured path of at least four major iterations since the introduction of its predecessor in 2010, finally hit the brick wall of Senate gridlock when a cloture vote failed to end debate. While this failure effectively
Continue Reading Failed Federal Cybersecurity Act May Emerge In Executive Order

On September 14, 2012, the State Bar of California Intellectual Property Section presented its 2012 IP and the Internet Conference. The conference featured high level experts from companies such as Twitter, Yahoo!, Warner Bros. Entertainment, Salseforce.com, True Religion Brand Jeans, and Autodesk, who covered emerging issues and hot topics in intellectual property and Internet law. Below are a few highlights
Continue Reading Summary of the 2012 IP and the Internet Conference Presented by the State Bar of California

By Robert Milligan, Joshua Salinas, and Jeffrey Oh

Balancing the rights of businesses to protect their economic interests with the rights of individuals to freely express themselves can be a complicated act requiring nuanced application of the law; even more so when the business is of a religious nature. In a fascinating case out of California, Judge Lucy H. Koh
Continue Reading Religious Organization’s Trade Secret Misappropriation Claim Against Anonymous Blogger Survives Anti-SLAPP Motion to Strike In California Federal Court

A recent federal decision from Connecticut confirms the notion that information knowingly posted on the Internet by its owner cannot constitute a protectable trade secret.  

On April 1, 2011, April Fools’ Day, a human relations consulting firm SharedXpertise allegedly disseminated by email and on its website a false statement that it had acquired its competitor LRP Publications. Kutik, a consultant for LRP, was offended. He


Continue Reading April Fools’ Day Prank Leads To Trade Secrets Litigation

On March 14th, a federal court in Denver, Colorado kept alive an electronic dance club owner’s trade secret theft and antitrust lawsuit against one of his former partners, alleging his partner stole his clubs’ MySpace “friends” and tried to drive the owner out of the Denver electronic dance market. In Christou v. Beatport, LLC, No. 10-cv-02912-RBJ-KMT, 2012 WL
Continue Reading Denver Club Owner Fails to Bounce His Partner’s Trade Secrets Lawsuit for Alleged MySpace Friends Theft

St. Patrick’s Day calls to mind the traditional Irish folklore of leprechauns and their hidden pots of gold. These hidden pots of gold illustrate the fundamental and straightforward rule for protecting prized trade secret information – keep it secret. A recent Ohio District Court, the Honorable Judge Michael R. Barrett presiding, denied a Plaintiff’s motion for Temporary Restraining Order because


Continue Reading Keep Your Pot of Gold Hidden, Ohio Court Rules Information Posted Online Not Trade Secret