We invite you to watch our recent webinar, where Seyfarth Shaw LLP’s trade secret, computer fraud, and non-compete attorneys navigated the ever-evolving business landscape, safeguarding trade secrets has become a critical priority for organizations seeking resilience and success.

In this webinar, our trade secret presenters, Justin Beyer, Joshua Salinas, and Dallin Wilson, delved deeper into the intricacies of building a

Continue Reading Webinar Recap! Employee Training Programs: Building a Culture of Confidentiality

Wednesday, March 27, 2024
2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Eastern
1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Central
12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. Mountain
11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Pacific

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About the Program

As we navigate the ever-evolving business landscape, safeguarding trade secrets has become a critical priority for organizations seeking resilience and success. In this pursuit, Seyfarth is thrilled

Continue Reading Upcoming Webinar! Employee Training Programs: Building a Culture of Confidentiality

In the ever-evolving digital landscape as well as legislative and regulatory changes and proposed changes to the use of non-competes, the preservation of trade secrets stands as a cornerstone for businesses striving to secure a competitive edge. As we continue to navigate the complexities of remote work and the jurisdictional differences in restrictive covenant enforcement, the safeguarding of these invaluable

Continue Reading Webinar Recap! Navigating the Intersection of Non-Compete Agreements and Employee Mobility

We invite you to watch our highly anticipated webinar, where Seyfarth Shaw LLP’s leading attorneys in non-compete law skillfully guide you through the intricacies of non-compete agreements in the United States, focusing on the latest updates in 2023. This essential webinar provides exclusive insights from our 2023-2024 edition of the 50-State Desktop Reference.

Here are the key takeaways from

Continue Reading Webinar Recap! What Employers Need to Know Regarding Non-Compete Changes in 2023

On May 25, 2023, the Second Circuit issued an opinion in Syntel Sterling Best Shores Mauritius Ltd. v. TriZetto Group, Inc., No. 21-1370 (2d Cir. 2023) that provides guidance regarding recoverable damages in trade secret misappropriation disputes under the Defend Trade Secrets Act (“DTSA”).

The Second Circuit held that under the DTSA unjust enrichment damages cannot be awarded for

Continue Reading Second Circuit Vacates Jury Award on Grounds that Damages Theory Lacked Evidence

Robert Milligan, Seyfarth Partner and Co-Chair of the Trade Secrets, Computer Fraud & Non-Competes Practice Group, is a speaker for the “Closing Plenary – Mid-Year Updates and Ethics of Inventorship of AI Patenting” session at the American Intellectual Property Law Association (AIPLA) Mid-Winter Institute on February 4 at 9 a.m. Pacific, in Rancho Mirage, California.

Robert Milligan is on the
Continue Reading Robert Milligan to Speak at AIPLA Mid-Winter Institute on Developments in Trade Secrets Law

From court closures and the way judges conduct appearances and trials to the expected wave of lawsuits across a multitude of areas and industries, the COVID-19 outbreak is having a notable impact in the litigation space—and is expected to for quite some time.

To help navigate the litigation landscape, we are kicking off a webinar series that will take a
Continue Reading Post-Pandemic Litigation Webinar Series

Continuing our annual tradition, we have compiled our top developments and headlines for 2019 & 2020 in trade secret, non-compete, and computer fraud law. Here’s what you need to know to keep abreast of the ever-changing law in this area.

1. Another Year, Another Attempt in Congress to Ban Non-Competes Nationwide

Senators Chris Murphy (D-Conn.) and Todd Young (R-Ind.) introduced legislation in 2019 entitled the Workforce Mobility Act (“WMA”). The WMA seeks to ban non-compete agreements outside of the sale of a business or dissolution of a partnership.

Not only would the WMA abolish covenants not to compete nationwide, outside of the extremely narrow exceptions highlighted above, but it would also provide the Department of Labor (DOL) and Federal Trade Commission (FTC) with broad enforcement power. If enacted, the legislation would empower the FTC and DOL to enforce the ban through fines on employers who either fail to notify employees that non-compete agreements are illegal or who require employees to sign covenants not to compete. Additionally, the WMA establishes a private right of action for all employees allegedly aggrieved by a violation of the WMA.

The WMA contains a carve out for parties to enter into an agreement to protect trade secrets. As currently drafted, the WMA does not abrogate the scope of protections provided by the Defend Trade Secrets Act.

Presently, there are no generally applicable federal restrictions on non-compete agreements, and enacting such a law would have to pass Constitutional muster. We expect to see continued activity at the federal legislative level to attempt to ban or limit the use of non-competes.

2. New State Legislation Regarding Restrictive Covenants

Continue Reading Top 10 Developments and Headlines in Trade Secret, Non-Compete, and Computer Fraud Law for 2019 & 2020

It is axiomatic that in order for information to be considered a trade secret, it must have been kept secret. But what if the trade secret is disclosed without the owner’s consent? Such was the issue in Intellisoft, Ltd. v. Wistron Corp. et al., No. H044281, slip op. (Cal. Ct. App. Oct. 16, 2019), a recent unpublished decision from the California Court of Appeal for the Sixth Appellate District. 
Continue Reading California Appellate Court Rules Publication of Trade Secrets, Even Without Owner Consent, Eviscerates Protection

Courts have long lamented that “computing damages in a trade secret case is not cut and dry,” Am. Sales Corp. v. Adventure Travel, Inc., 862 F. Supp. 1476, 1479 (E.D. Va. 1994), meaning that “every [trade secret] case requires a flexible and imaginative approach to the problem of damages,” Univ. Computing Co. v. Lykes-Youngstown Corp., 504 F.2d 518, 538 (5th Cir. 1974).

The federal Defend Trade Secrets Act (“DTSA”) and virtually every state’s version of the Uniform Trade Secrets Act (“UTSA”) (only New York has not adopted the UTSA) permits recovery of damages for (1) actual loss caused by the misappropriation; (2) unjust enrichment that is not addressed in computing damages for actual loss; or (3) a reasonable royalty for the misappropriator’s unauthorized disclosure or use of the trade secret. There has been little guidance from the courts, however, as to how to calculate these different, and sometimes competing damages calculations, many relying on the “flexible and imaginative approach” set forth in the Fifth Circuit’s 1974 pre-UTSA University Computing decision. Even more difficult is the case where a plaintiff’s damages are based on the defendant’s anticipated future use of the trade secret, given that those damages necessarily will involve speculation about the revenues the defendant will generate from its use of the trade secret.
Continue Reading Can a Party Recover Damages for the Anticipated Future Use of Trade Secrets?