By Jessica Mendelson and Robert Milligan

Social media legislation restricting access to personal social media accounts has been a hot topic in recent months, and as 2013 progresses, more and more states seem poised to pass such legislation.  Here’s a roundup of some of the more recent social media legislation passed in Utah, New Mexico,

On January 30th, the Washington state senate introduced a bill which would prohibit public and private employers within the state from requiring employees to turn over their online social-network account passwords.  Senate Bill 5211.  As we previously blogged, a number of states have passed or are considering similar legislation, which ostensibly is aimed at

By Jessica Mendelson and Robert Milligan

The Michigan Legislature recently passed the Internet Privacy Protection Act (“IPPA”), otherwise known as House Bill 5523. On December 28, 2012, Michigan Governor Rick Snyder signed the IPPA, making Michigan the fourth state to enact a social media privacy law regulating employers. In explaining the reasoning behind the law,

California Governor Jerry Brown announced on Twitter, Facebook, Google+, LinkedIn and MySpace today that he has signed two bills (Senate Bill 1349 and Assembly Bill 1844) prohibiting public and private postsecondary schools and California employers from requiring applicants and employees to provide their social media account passwords.

“California pioneered the social media revolution. These laws

By Ronald Kramer

On August 1, 2012, Illinois became the second state in the nation to adopt a law prohibiting employers from seeking employee or prospective employee passwords to access their non-public portions of their social networking sites.

The Illinois’ law, an amendment to the Right to Privacy in the Workplace Act that will become

On Monday March 26, 2012, Senators Richard Blumenthal (Connecticut) and Chuck Schumer (New York), called for federal agencies to determine whether requiring prospective hires to hand over social networking usernames and passwords violates federal law. Blumenthal and Schumer called on the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) to investigate whether such practices violate federal