On January 8th, after years of litigation and numerous delays, Executive Recruiter David Nosal was sentenced to one year and a day in federal prison for his April 25, 2013 conviction on three counts under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”), two counts under the Economic Espionage Act (“EEA”), and one count of conspiracy to violate the CFAA and
Continue Reading Nosal Update: Nosal Sentenced to One Year in Federal Prison

LinkedIn is the biggest professional networking site in the world.  It has more than 225 million users in more than 200 countries and territories.  Approximately 75 million users are in the United States.  Many of those users have signed non-solicitation agreements with their employers prohibiting them from soliciting the employers’ customers and workers.  Unfortunately, many of those non-solicitation agreements are
Continue Reading When does LinkedIn Activity Violate Non-Solicitation Agreements?

Once upon a midnight dreary, in the annus horribilis of 2000, the United States District Court for the District of Colorado issued its terrifying decision in what is the seminal artificial vampire fangs case entitled Nutting v. RAM Southwest, Inc., 106 F. Supp. 2d 1121 (D. Col. July 10, 2000).

 The plaintiff in this chilling tale, Mr. Nutting, was
Continue Reading 13 Scary Years Ago Court Issued Death Sentences In Horrid Dispute Over Vampire Fangs.

The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia recently denied a motion to dismiss a counterclaim for violation of Virginia’s Uniform Trade Secrets Act (“VUTSA”), holding that the counterclaim sufficiently alleged trade secret misappropriation based on improper acquisition of a trade secret, even in the absence of allegations of use or disclosure.

Factual allegations:

Plaintiff Jacqueline
Continue Reading Federal Court Rules Trade Secret Misappropriation Sufficiently Alleged Based on Improper Acquisition, Even in Absence of Use or Disclosure

In dismissing a claim for violation of Fourth Amendment rights, the United States District Court for the District of Nevada in Rosario v. Clark County School District, No. 2:13-CV-362, 2013 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 93963 (Nev. Jul. 3, 2013) recently became the latest court to hold there is no reasonable expectation of privacy in Twitter tweets.

This case arises
Continue Reading Nevada District Court Finds No Reasonable Expectation of Privacy in Private Twitter Posts

The California Uniform Trade Secrets Act (“CUTSA”) allows for an award of attorney’s fees to the prevailing party on a trade secret misappropriation claim. The statute permits award of attorney’s fees to a plaintiff for a defendant’s “willful and malicious” misappropriation and to a defendant when a plaintiff makes a claim in “bad faith”:

“If a claim of misappropriation is

Continue Reading Court Awards Attorney’s Fees for “Bad Faith” Trade Secret Misappropriation Claim

In Parts I and II of this post, we looked at the Court’s ruling on Nosal’s motion for acquittal and new trial following his conviction of three CFAA counts, two EEA counts and one count of conspiracy. In this final part, we look at what may lie ahead for Nosal and lessons employers may learn from this case.

What’s Next
Continue Reading Nosal Update: Court Denies Motion for Acquittal and New Trial in Marathon CFAA and Trade Secret Misappropriation Criminal Case – Part III

In Part I of this post, we reviewed the Court’s ruling on Nosal’s conviction on the CFAA counts. Here in Part II, we turn to the Court’s ruling on the EEA counts, and the exclusion of evidence regarding Nosal’s non-compete provision.

B.    Nosal’s Conviction on the EEA Counts:

Nosal was convicted of two counts under the EEA for downloading,
Continue Reading Nosal Update: Court Denies Motion for Acquittal and New Trial in Marathon CFAA and Trade Secret Misappropriation Criminal Case – Part II

On April 25, 2013, a federal jury convicted Executive Recruiter David Nosal on three counts under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”), two counts under the Economic Espionage Act (“EEA”), and one count of conspiracy to violate the CFAA and EEA, for Nosal’s conduct leaving his former employer and establishing a competing business in 2004 and 2005.

The conviction
Continue Reading Nosal Update: Court Denies Motion for Acquittal and New Trial in Marathon CFAA and Trade Secret Misappropriation Criminal Case – Part I

Counterfeiting and piracy is estimated to cost the U.S. hundreds of billions of dollars every year.  According to the Business Software Alliance, if the U.S. could reduce piracy by 10 percent in two years, it would add $52 billion in GDP, $8 billion in tax revenue, and create more than 25,000 new jobs. California alone is losing an estimated
Continue Reading A New and Potentially Powerful Weapon Against Foreign Counterfeiters and Pirates