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Trading Secrets A Law Blog on Trade Secrets, Non-Competes, and Computer Fraud

Tag Archives: Australia

Seyfarth to Host Webinar on International Trade Secrets and Non-Compete Law

Posted in International, Non-Compete Enforceability, Practice & Procedure, Trade Secrets

When the Walt Disney Company built the “It’s a Small World” ® ride for the New York World’s Fair in 1964, they probably had no idea of the challenges that globalization could pose 50 years later. From cases involving the sale of stolen trade secrets to foreign companies to departing employees setting up competing business in different jurisdictions, many … Continue Reading

Upcoming On-Demand Webinar: International Trade Secrets and Non-Compete Law Update

Posted in International, Non-Compete Enforceability, Trade Secrets

To accommodate our global audience, the fifth installment in the 2014 Trade Secrets Webinar Series will be available as an on-demand broadcast on Thursday, July 31, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. Central. Please register to receive access to the broadcast.

Seyfarth attorneys Wan Li, Ming Henderson, Justine Turnbull and Daniel Hart  will focus on non-compete and trade secret considerations from an … Continue Reading

Australia Non-Compete Primer: Protecting Your Business Interests Post-Employment

Posted in Non-Compete Enforceability, Restrictive Covenants, Trade Secrets

By Justine Turnbull and Cassie Howman-Giles

Given difficult economic times, protection of confidential information (including trade secrets) has become a greater priority for business in Australia. As a result, post-employment restraint litigation is increasingly common as employers attempt to protect their confidential information and restrain former employees from soliciting the business of their valued clients.

This note outlines the position … Continue Reading

U.S. Counsels Cross-Border Consistency In Criminal Consequences For Trade Secret Theft

Posted in International, Legislation, Trade Secrets

What do the laws of the United States, Peru and Australia have in common when it comes to imposing similar riminal penalties for trade secret misappropriation?  Virtually nothing!

In the U.S., criminal penalties for misappropriating trade secrets range from 10 to 15 years.  In Peru, the maximum criminal sentence for stealing trade secrets is 2 years.  And in Australia, there … Continue Reading